Earthquake Preparedness

The-Dude-&-Pete-1earthquake

The recent small tremor felt on the North Peninsula had me thinking back to the article published by the NY Times titled “The Really Big One”. I’m sure that most of us have heard of the article or at least witnessed the panic than ensued through social media and news outlets over the story, but we have been hearing something of this “Big One” for generations in the area.

The bad news is that we can really do nothing to stop such large geological events from happening; the good news is we can prepare.

Our preparations, if done correctly and completely can make such events that can severely disrupt our lives much more manageable and less stressful for ourselves, our family and in the community at large. It can be argued that preparation falls into the category of a civic responsibility in a smaller community like we have on the North Peninsula. Prepared, we can be much less of a strain on the infrastructure. The infrastructure is bound to be handicapped or at worst, nonfunctional for an extended amount of time during an emergency brought about from a natural occurring event.Web-Lines

A wise man once said that the separation is in the preparation. Through the media we have seen the unprepared lined up at grocery stores, hardware stores and gas stations before predictable storms and after unpredictable events.

Isn’t it nice to know you have the choice not to be one of those people?

Hartnagel-suppliesPreparation supplies should include a first aid kit, survival tools and emergency water and food. Storage of enough supplies to last at least 3 days should be the minimum, but many recommendations say to prepare for 3 weeks. For the preparedness to ideally work these items should be used only in the event of an emergency and stored in a container that is easy to transport encase you need to travel quickly.

The following list was taken from both the CDC website section on earthquake preparedness and The American Red Cross website.
Closet-storage
Our combined list can be downloaded HERE as a .pdf for use as a checklist. This list will ONLY apply for your home and NOT for your automobile or workplace. Both links to the CDC and the American Red Cross have thorough information on how to best prepare and act in case of a natural emergency and refreshing your knowledge on what to do for and your family is a great idea for all to review.

Items in BLUE can be bought In-store at either of our Port Angeles locations listed below.
Angeles Millwork & Lumber Co. 1601 S. “C” Street
Hartnagel Building Supply 3111 HWY 101 East

First Aid Kit
Store your first aid supplies in a tool box or fishing tackle box unless you have a self-contained kit, like we sell at our stores, so they will be easy to carry and protected from water. Inspect your kit regularly and keep it freshly stocked. NOTE: Important medical information and most prescriptions can be stored in the refrigerator, which also provides excellent protection from fires.

Our self-contained First Aid kits found in both stores contains all items marked in ORANGE.

Drugs/Medications
• Hydrogen peroxide to wash and disinfect wounds
• Antibiotic ointment
• Individually wrapped alcohol swabs
• Aspirin and non-aspirin tablets
• Prescriptions and any long-term medications (keep these current)
• Diarrhea medicine
• Eye wash

Dressings
• Bandage strips
• Ace bandages
• Rolled gauze
• Cotton-tipped swabs
• Adhesive tape roll
Other First Aid Supplies
• First aid book
• Scissors
• Tweezers
• Latex Gloves
• Eye dropper
• Thermometer
• Bar soap
• Tissues
• Sunscreen
• Paper cups
• Pocket knife
• Small plastic bags
• Safety pins
• Needle and thread
• Instant cold packs for sprains
• Sanitary napkins
• Splinting materials

Tools and supplies
• Ax, shovel, broom
• Screwdriver, pliers, hammer, adjustable wrench
• Rope for towing or rescue
• Plastic sheeting and tape
• Aluminum foil

Items for safety and comfort
• Candles
• Waterproof matches
• Change of clothing
• Can opener
• Tupperware
• Garden hose (for siphoning and firefighting)
• Tent
• Recreational supplies for children and adults
• Portable radio
• Flashlight
• Multiple batteries and sizes
• Eyeglasses
• Fire extinguisher — multipurpose, dry chemical type
• Food and water for pets
• Paper, pencil
• Cash

Sanitation
• Toilet paper
• Liquid detergent
• Feminine supplies
• Plastic garbage bags and ties
• Plastic bucket with tight lid
• Disinfectant
• Household chlorine bleach
• Poop bags and scooper for pet waste

Clothing and Bedding
• Sturdy shoes that can provide protection from broken glass, nails, and other debris
• Gloves (heavy and durable for cleaning up debris)
• Rain gear
• Blankets or sleeping bags
• Warm clothing
• Sunglasses (keep your spare eyeglasses in the emergency kit, too.)

Documents
• Will, insurance policies, contracts deeds, stocks and bonds
• Passports, social security cards, immunization records
• Bank account numbers
• Credit card account numbers and companies
• Inventory of valuable household goods, important telephone numbers
• Family records (birth, marriage, death certificates)

Water
• Store water in plastic containers such as soft drink bottles. Avoid using containers that will decompose or break, such as milk cartons or glass bottles. A normally active person needs to drink at least two quarts of water each day. Hot environments and intense physical activity can double that amount. Children, nursing mothers, and ill people will need more.
• Store one gallon of water per person per day. Don’t forget your pets.
• Keep at least a three-day supply of water per person (two quarts for drinking, two quarts for each person in your household for food preparation/sanitation).
• Change this water every six months.
• Water filters sold in camping and outdoor stores are a great alternative to bleach disinfection.
• Household liquid bleach can be used to kill microorganisms: Use only regular household liquid bleach that contains 5.25 percent sodium hypochlorite.
Do not use scented bleaches, colorsafe bleaches or bleaches with added cleaners.
• Add 16 drops of bleach per gallon of water, stir and let stand for 30 minutes. If the water does not have a slight bleach odor, repeat the dosage and let stand another 15 minutes.
• The only agent used to treat water should be household liquid bleach. Other chemicals, such as iodine water treatment products sold in camping or surplus stores that do not contain 5.25 percent sodium hypochlorite as the only active ingredient, are not recommended and should not be used.

Food
• Ready-to-eat canned meats, fruits, vegetables.
• Canned juices, milk, soup
• Sugar, salt, pepper
• High energy foods such as peanut butter, jelly, crackers, granola bars, trail mix; foods that will not increase thirst.
• Vitamins
• Foods for infants, elderly, persons with special dietary needs
• Comfort/stress foods: cookies, hard candy, sweetened cereals, lollipops, instant coffee, tea bags.
• Pet food, at least one ounce per animal pound per day.
• Avoid foods like rice, pasta and dry beans that require a great deal of water to prepare.
• Remember to restock your food once a year.

**Remember to include special needs family members such as a baby or an older person might have. It is also good to store in a water proof plastic bag important family documents (passports, wills, medical records etc.) along with your earthquake survival kit.

Josh-Bergesen

Josh Bergesen, Advertising Coordinator
Lumber Traders, INC.
Angeles Millwork & Lumber Co.
Hartnagel Building Supply

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