Specialty Woods

NOT ALL WOODS AND SIZES CAN BE FOUND AT BOTH LOCATIONS.
Please call ahead to verify stock, sizes and quantity on hand.
Hardwoods are only stocked at Hartnagel Building Supply.

Pine

PINE Color/Appearance: Heartwood is reddish brown, sapwood is yellowish white.

Grain/Texture: Straight grained with medium texture.

Rot Resistance:  The heartwood is rated as moderate to low in decay resistance.

Workability: Pine works well with both hand and machine tools. Glues and finishes well.

Sustainability: This wood species is reported by the IUCN as a species of least concern.

Common Uses: Veneer, plywood, sheathing, sub-flooring, boxes, crates, posts/poles, interior trim, cabinetry, and construction lumber.

Comments: Although Pine is technically classified as a yellow (hard) pine, it shares many characteristics with white (soft) pines, having a considerably lower density than the yellow pine species found in the eastern United States.

Douglas Fir

DOUG-FIR

Color/Appearance: Varies in color based upon age and location of tree.  Wood can exhibit wild grain patterns.

Grain/Texture: Grain is generally straight, or slightly wavy. Medium to coarse texture.

Rot Resistance:  Douglas Fir heartwood is rated to be moderately durable in regard to decay, but can susceptible to insect attack.

Workability: Machines well, has a moderate blunting effect on cutters. Accepts stains, glues, and finishes well.

Sustainability: This wood species is reported by the IUCN as a species of least concern.

Common Uses: Veneer, plywood, and structural, construction lumber.

Comments: It is an incredibly valuable commercial timber, widely used in construction and building purposes. The wood is very stiff and strong for its weight, and is also among the hardest and heaviest softwoods commercially available.

Western Red Cedar

WESTERN-RED-CEDAR

Color/Appearance: Heartwood red to a pink brown, often with streaks and bands of darker red/brown areas. Narrow sapwood is pale yellowish white.

Grain/Texture: Has a straight grain and a medium to coarse texture.

Rot Resistance:  Rated as durable to very durable in regard to decay resistance, though it has mixed resistance to insect attack.

Workability: Easy to work. It can dents and scratches easily and sanding can be unevenly due to differences in density. Glues and finishes well. Iron-based fasteners can stain and discolor the wood, especially with moisture.

Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

Common Uses: Shingles, exterior siding, lumber, boxes, crates, and musical instruments.

Comments: Used from rough-sawn lumber for use in home construction.

Tennessee Cedar

TENNESSSEE-CEDAR

Color/Appearance: Heartwood is light to medium red brown.  Sapwood is light tan to off-white. It’s not uncommon for boards to contain pockets of partially decayed wood (peck).

Grain/Texture: Grain is straight, with a medium to fine uniform texture.

Rot Resistance: Dried wood is rated as durable to very durable in regards to decay resistance.

Workability: Easy to work with both hand and machine tools. Holds paint very well. Stains, glues, and finishes well. Excellent dimensional stability.

Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

Common Uses: Fence posts, construction lumber, sheathing, siding, chests, and exterior furniture.

Comments: Holds paint well.  This is the aromatic cedar used in cedar chests.

Western Hemlock

WESTERN-HEMLOCK

Color/Appearance: Heartwood is light reddish brown. Sapwood may be slightly lighter in color. The growth rings can exhibit interesting grain patterns on flatsawn surfaces.

Grain/Texture: Grain/Texture: Grain is generally straight, with a coarse, uneven texture.

Rot Resistance: Rated as non-durable regarding decay resistance, and also susceptible to insect attack.

Workability: Working properties are good, but the different density between the soft earlywood and the hard latewood can create dips and uneven surfaces when sanded. Glues, stains, and finishes well.

Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

Common Uses: Boxes, pallets, crates, plywood, framing, and other construction purposes.

Comments: The State tree of Washington

Red Oak

RED-OAK

Color/Appearance: Has a light to medium reddish-brown color, though there can be a fair amount of variation in color.

Grain/Texture: Has medium-to-large pores and a fairly coarse grain.

Rot Resistance: Red oaks do not have the level of decay and rot resistance that White Oaks possess. Durability should be considered minimal.

Workability: Easy to glue, and takes stain and finishes very well. It can split, so predrill.

Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

Common Uses: Cabinetry, furniture, interior trim, flooring, and veneer.

Comments: Southern Red Oak falls into the red oak group, and shares many of the same traits as Red Oak. It’s considered to be somewhat
inferior to Northern Red Oak.

 Red Alder

RED-ALDER

Color/Appearance: Tends to be a light tan to reddish brown; color darkens and reddens with age. The grain pattern is similar to Birch though redder.

Grain/Texture: Grain is generally straight, with a moderately fine, uniform texture.

Rot Resistance: Rated non-durable to perishable regarding decay resistance.

Workability: Very easy to work with both hand and machine tools & sands easy. The wood is very soft and care must be taken to avoid denting. Accepts stains, glues, and finishes well.

Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

Common Uses: Veneer, plywood, furniture, cabinetry, millwork & musical instruments.

Comments: The most abundant hardwood in the Pacific Northwest and is a commercially important lumber.

Birch

BIRCH

Color/Appearance: Heartwood tends to be a light reddish brown, with nearly white sapwood.

Grain/Texture: Grain is generally straight or slightly wavy, with a fine, even texture. Low natural luster.

Rot Resistance: Birch is perishable, and will readily rot and decay if exposed to the elements. The wood is susceptible to insect attack.

Workability: Easy to work with hand and machine tools, though with wild grain can cause grain tearout. Turns, glues, and finishes well.

Sustainability: This wood species is reported by the IUCN as a species of least concern.

Common Uses: Plywood, boxes, turned objects, interior trim, and other small specialty wood items.

Comments: Birch is one of the most widely used woods for veneer and plywood worldwide. Veneer is also used for doors, furniture, and paneling.

 Black Walnut

BLACK-WALNUT

Color/Appearance: Heartwood can range from a lighter pale brown to a dark chocolate brown with darker brown streaks. Sapwood is pale yellow-gray to nearly white.

Grain/Texture: Grain is usually straight, but can be irregular. Has a medium texture and moderate natural luster.

Rot Resistance: Rated very durable in terms of decay resistance, though it is susceptible to insect attack.

Workability: Typically easy to work provided the grain is straight and regular. Accepts stains, glues and finishes well. Responds well to steam bending.

Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

Common Uses: Furniture, cabinetry, gunstocks, interior paneling, veneer, turned items, and novelties.

Comments: Its great working characteristics, along with its rich color makes it a favorite of woodworking.

Cherry

CHERRY

Color/Appearance: Heartwood is a light pinkish brown to a medium reddish brown. Sapwood is a pale yellowish color.

Grain/Texture: The grain is usually straight and easy to work, with the exception of figured pieces with curly grain patterns. Has a fine, even texture with moderate natural luster.

Rot Resistance: Heartwood is rated as being very durable and resistant to decay.

Workability: Known as one of the best for workability. It is stable, straight-grained, and machines well. Their can be difficulties if the wood is stained, as it can sometimes it can be blotchy.

Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

Common Uses: Cabinetry, fine furniture, flooring, veneer, turned objects, and small items.

Comments: Develops a rich reddish-brown patina as it ages that is frequently imitated with wood stains.

Eastern Maple

EASTERN-MAPLE

Color/Appearance: Sapwood is most commonly used & ranges from nearly white, to an off-white cream color, sometimes with a reddish or golden hue.

Grain/Texture: The grain is generally straight, but may be wavy. Has a fine, even texture.

Rot Resistance: Rated as non-durable to perishable, and susceptible to insect attack.

Workability: Easy to work, slightly more difficult than Soft Maple due to higher density. Has a tendency to burn when being machined. Turns, glues, and finishes well, blotches can occur when staining.

Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

Common Uses: Flooring, veneer, musical instruments, cutting boards, workbenches, turned objects and specialty wood items.

Comments: Hard Maple is stronger, stiffer, harder, and denser than the other species of Maple commercially available in lumber form.

Poplar

POPLAR

Color/Appearance: Heartwood is cream to yellowish brown, with occasional streaks of gray or green. Sapwood is pale yellow to white, not always clearly divided from the heartwood.

Grain/Texture: Usually has a straight, uniform grain, with a medium texture and a low natural luster.

Rot Resistance: Heartwood is rated as being moderately durable to non-durable; susceptible to insect attack.

Workability: Very easy to work but very soft and can sometimes leave fuzzy surfaces and edges.

Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

Common Uses: Used for pallets, crates, upholstered furniture frames, paper and plywood.

Comments: The most common utility hardwoods in the United States.

Purpleheart

PURPLE-HEART

Color/Appearance: Freshly cut the heartwood is a dull grayish/purplish brown. Upon exposure the wood becomes a deeper eggplant purple.

Grain/Texture: Grain is usually straight, but can be wavy or irregular. Medium texture with a natural luster.

Rot Resistance: Rated very durable, resists both decay and most insect attacks, though it can be susceptible to attack from marine borers.

Workability: Will exude a gummy resin that can clog tools and complicate the machining process. Depending on the grain orientation, can be hard to plane without tearout.

Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

Common Uses: Inlays/accent pieces, flooring, furniture, boatbuilding, heavy construction, and specialty wood items.

Comments: The colorful South American hardwood is extremely popular for furniture and other designs that demand a pop of original color.

 

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