Lumber Commodity Price List for November 20th, 2017

Lumber is a commodity with prices fluctuating weekly due to market conditions. With our Lumber Commodity Price Sheet we look to keep you as informed as possible about those prices.  Click on the price list for a downloadable or printable .PDF version. Below the Price List is the Commodity Price Chart for quick reference into what is happening in the markets along with showing overall market trends.

PRINT the price list HERE

Framing Lumber – We proudly stock #2 & better kiln dried PREMIUM Douglas Fir
Our lumber is Structurally sound, has 4 square edges & is less prone to splits & checks. 

All lengths marked in ORANGE are NOT stocked at Home Depot

8′ 10′ 12′ 14′ 16′ 18′ 20′
2×4 $3.93 $5.27 $6.51 $7.48 $9.09 $9.96 $10.98
2×6 $6.96 $9.08 $11.16 $13.23 $16.67 $17.69 $19.34
2×8 $9.16 $11.37 $13.87 $16.33 $19.93 $21.00 $23.72
2×10 $12.35 $15.57 $18.68 $22.14 $26.88 $29.37 $32.63
2×12 $14.78 $18.47 $22.36 $25.05 $32.63 $35.15 $39.05

Pressure Treated Lumber – We proudly stock #2 & better CA-C (Copper Azole) incised treated Hemlock for ground contact.
Worry free application, treated to withstand the elements, approved for ground contact & in-ground use.

8′ 10′ 12′ 14′ 16′ 18′ 20′
2×4 $6.97 $8.71 $10.46 $12.21 $13.94 S/O $17.94
2×6 $10.74 $13.43 $16.11 $18.80 $21.49 S/O $27.65
2×8 $14.63 $18.29 $21.94 $25.59 $29.26 S/O $37.65
2×10 $18.67 $23.34 $28.00 $32.67 $37.33 S/O $48.04
2×12 $23.55 $29.43 $35.31 $41.20 $47.09 S/O $60.59

Pressure Treated Decking – We proudly stock #2 & better PREMIUM smooth Douglas Fir decking.
Treated for local weather, dimensionally stable, & looks better longer.

8′ 10′ 12′ 14′ 16′ 18′ 20′
2×4 $7.20 $9.01 $10.80 $12.60 $14.40 S/O $18.53
2×6 $10.80 $13.50 $16.20 $18.90 $21.60 S/O $27.79

Framing Panels – We proudly stock only APA Rated & Graded panels.
APA rated for quality assurance, third party verification, & building code compliant.

  3/8″ 7/16″ 1/2″ 5/8″ 3/4″ 1″ 1 1/8″
OSB N/A $13.46 $16.88 $19.90 $27.82 N/A N/A
CDX $17.68 N/A $20.00 $25.64 $29.37 N/A N/A
ACX $36.82 N/A $40.35 $42.39 $43.87 S/O N/A
T&G N/A N/A N/A N/A $33.87 N/A $50.65

Plaster Board – We proudly stock only CertainTeed Brand Gypsum.
Easi-light for better handling, M2 Tech for mold and moisture resistance.

   8′    8′
1/2″x4′ Ultralight $11.58 1/2″x4′ Ultralight Moisture Resistant $13.60
5/8″x4′ Type X $13.50 5/8″x4′ Type X Moisture Resistant $16.86

Fencing – We proudly stock components that are designed for the outdoors.
Western Red Cedar & always rated for ground contact.

5′ 6′ 8′   8′
1×4 N/A $1.89 $2.58 Treated 4×4 Post $11.17
1×6 $2.49 $3.49 $5.19 60# Concrete Mix $3.30

Place your order today!  Ask about our delivery services and free estimates for all our building materials.

Prices are subject to change without notice. Call for current availability.  Lumber commodity pricing is updated weekly.

Commodity Pricing Jan 2017 - YTD

 

 

Making the Grade in Lumber Quality

Selecting the right piece of framing lumber for your project does not have to be as complex as the grading rules. This guide to the grades of lumber, is meant to help you get past the uncertainty by giving you the knowledge of what the grades allow and how to achieve an apple to apple comparison of what you see.

In the Pacific Northwest, our common framing lumber species are:

Every species has different characteristics for strength and appearance, but they are all graded on the same rules from the American Lumber Standards Committee.  The grades, for all that they do, are not much more than a way of telling the user what kind of quality they are buying.

The higher the grade, the better the lumber.

Before going into the Lumber Grading Standards chart to understand grades we need to understand each defect presented;

Checking – A crack in the board that happens along the growth rings and does not go through the entire board.

Grain – Determined by the number of growth rings in the board.  Typically measured in rings per inch and is viewed from the end grain of the board.

Knots – A naturally occurring defect in the board caused by branches as the tree grows.  Small tight knots are perfectly fine but large loose knots that may fall out are of greater concern.

Pitch or Sap – How trees heal wounds from pruning or fight off other diseases that could be otherwise harmful to a healthy tree.

Pitch Pockets – Places in the board where the tree has grown around the sap enclosing the wound.  These pockets coupled with the tight bark layer can be found in the wide face of a board and are not the same as edge wane.

Shake – The separation of woods growth rings that occurs either on the face of the wood or below the surface.

Skips – A manufacturing defect where planners and saws “bounce” along a board or pull the grain, causing an uneven surface to be presented.

Grain Slope – A measurement of the deviation from the natural growth of the board.  Simply put, it is the board cut parallel to the grain or across it.

Splits – Cracks in the wood that go all the way through the board.

Stains or Discolorations – Can be caused by insects, fungal decay, or heartwood/sapwood.  Some stains have no effect on the performance of the wood, while others limit the strength of the wood. This is because they come from the fast-growing center of the tree.

Wane -The uneven edge of the tree that used to contain the bark of the tree before it was milled.

Warp – In a board is the deviation from straight and true and is called by many different names.

  • A bow in the board is the end to end change on the wide face. This looks like the bottom of a boat.

  • A crook in the board is the warping that happens along the narrow edge. This looks like a hockey stick.

  • A cup in the board is when the wide face curves with the flat grain creating a hollow in the board. This looks like a canoe.

  • A twist in the board is a combination of multiple warping defects. This often looks like a boomerang or an airplane propeller.

Clear wood requirement is the amount of good wood left after all the defects have been removed from the clean faces of the wood.

The chart below shows the seven grades of framing lumber and the allowable deviation from a perfect piece of lumber.

Lumber Grade Stamps

The final piece of the lumber puzzle is the ability to look at a grade stamp to understand what it is telling you.   All stamps on lumber tell us the exact same information; (a) the grading agency, (b) the mill designation, (c) the approved grade, (d) the wood species group, (e) the moisture content.

Common Application

In most jurisdictions, the building code requires #2 Structural, commonly referred to as #2 & Better. This is why it is found at most lumber yards and home centers in your area.  Lumber yards will differ on the primary species family they carry.  One yard might sell Douglas Fir for the strength characteristics while another chooses Western Hemlock because it is cheaper while still meeting the same building codes.

In many commercial uses, select structural lumber is required because of the strength of the wood fiber.  Typically, these are applications with very high point loads due to the increased capacity of the structure itself for storage or for people. Most residential construction that is done with Select Structural lumber is done because the builder and the homeowner prefer the quality of the fiber.

The lesser grades of lumber are often used where structural codes do not matter in industrial or temporary applications.  These can be things like pallets and packaging for shipment or concrete footing work where one good face will usually be adequate.

Whatever lumber you choose, knowing the grade will help you determine if it is right for your project.  Grading used in conjunction with the design tables will help make sure that your project lasts for as long as you want it to.

For more information on the framing lumber grading rules, please visit the following sources;

 

Kelly Fox – CEO

Lumber Traders Inc.
Angeles Millwork & Lumber Co. Inc.
Hartnagel Building Supply

Treated Right – The Platinum Tape, a blog by Kelly Fox

wHISKEY-SODA2Have you ever felt like you did not get what you paid for? At one point or another in life all of us will have that feeling. It is a lot like a bourbon and soda that is nearly all soda. In every business there is an opportunity to cut a corner or reduce an expense by taking out some of the “good stuff”.  At Angeles Millwork and Lumber Company and Hartnagel Building Supply, we are all about putting more of the “good stuff” back into what you are buying.

Against some national competitors, we see that products are being sold into our market space that are a far cry from what they used to be.

A great example is in pressure treated lumber. It is not always rated for ground contact, even though it looks and feels just like the same product you can buy at every other lumber yard in the area.

In some cases, the same pressure treated lumber they sell is a construction grade that is not even building code approved.

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To give you more of what you want for your money, we will only sell incised pressure treated lumber that is rated for ground contact and building code compliant. Our NatureDeck© treated decking product is a premium Douglas Fir and rated for above ground use because of the intended application.

Other product benefits we sell are not always as clear cut as the differences in our treated lumber but they are equally as important. For example, the cedar decking products at our stores, from the 5/4 x4 to the 2×6, are kiln dried so that you can finish your project quickly. Green decking products require them to be installed and seasoned well beyond being dry on the surface, before you can apply the deck stain of your choice. (When you deck stain does not last as long as the can said it would, your deck was probably not as dry as it should have been.)

Our kiln dried decking products can be installed, stained, and enjoyed about eight weeks faster than product bought as green or wet. Your time and effort are worth something to us and dry decking is one way that we can prove it.

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On top of the products you buy, service is the “good stuff” that many people need when they do not speak the home repair or building language. Rather than asking you to learn to speak building materials, our stores will spend more than 1000 hours in 2016 dedicated to training on our products and services so that we are better at speaking your language when you stop by. I am confident that you will enjoy the difference!

When you choose to buy from us, you will get what you pay for. Sometimes we will be less expensive and sometimes we will be more. The one thing you should never have to question is the value you receive or wonder if you got any scotch with your soda!

 

As you shop the stores, visit us online, or have questions about the products we sell compared to our competition, please ask the salesperson or email me at kellyf@lumbertradersinc.com and we will be happy to help.

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Warm Regards,

Kelly Fox, CEO
Lumber Traders, INC.
Angeles Millwork & Lumber Co.
Hartnagel Building Supply